DHS and ICE taking children away from American citizen mothers.

In a disturbing finding, it appears the federal govt may be seeking to divide families by deporting the illegal parent and taking the U.S. citizen children away from their U.S. citizen parent.  www.sanfranciscoimmigrationservices.com

By LAUREN GILGER, CHARLES GORRA, and BRIAN ROSS

Feb. 2, 2012

The scars of childbirth were still healing on Amelia Reyes Jimenez’s stomach in 2008 when police came to her Phoenix apartment and took her three-month-old daughter from her arms.

Three and a half years later, Reyes Jimenez and her four children have become statistics in the U.S. crackdown on illegal immigration. Each year thousands of children of undocumented immigrants, like Amelia’s kids, wind up in foster care when their parents are arrested for immigration violations. Some are even adopted by U.S. citizens while their parents are held in federal detention centers or deported back to their native countries.

Reyes Jimenez’s son and three daughters are now living in foster care in Phoenix, and are awaiting possible adoption. Reyes Jimenez is back in Mexico, her parental rights terminated by an Arizona judge, and she cries when she remembers the raid that began it all.

“My daughters were calling, ‘Mommy, my Mommy,'” said Reyes Jimenez. “I felt destroyed. I felt like I would never see my girls, even worse [the baby] was so small. I had just bought her cradle and her stroller.”

A new study by the human rights group Applied Research Center estimates that as of summer 2011 there were at least 5,100 children of detained immigrants in foster care in 22 states.

“It’s clearly a systemic problem,” said Rinku Sen, executive director of ARC. “It happens again and again and again in multiple states, multiple counties, different ICE agents, different detention centers, different judges.” Though the report did not say how many kids had been adopted, ARC did find that detained parents were at risk of permanent separation from their kids because of deportation.

“It’s sort of like saying, okay, you came here as an undocumented immigrant, we’re going to break up your family, we’re going to keep your kids,” said John De Leon, and attorney who represents the Guatemalan and Mexican consulate in immigration cases. He says he has seen the issue grow into a national problem over the last decade.

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